Super termites are leaving decades-old trees gutted and vulnerable, as reported by the South Florida Sun Sentinel.

These newly arrived Formosan and Asian subterranean termites are hollowing out decades-old canopies and making them vulnerable to high winds. This puts a greater risk of normally wind resistant trees, such as oaks, compromised and at greater risk of being toppled during high wind storms, tropical storms or hurricanes.

These termites are being called “super termites” as they are making their homes in living trees instead of dead or harvested wood such as timber used in homes and other construction. According to UF/IFAS, Broward County has a big population of Asian subterranean termites. They are attacking the large canopies in some of the most scenic areas of Broward County and in most of South Florida.

These termites are attracted to trees that have wounds from chainsaws, lightening, or other damage such as falling limbs. Healthy trees emit a pheromone that repels insects, but damaged trees do just the opposite. Older trees are particularly vulnerable to the new breed of invasive termites.

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by Diana Quigley, Education and Change Management Manager, Campbell Property Management